Top 10 Blues Rock Guitarists of the 1970s

This list of the Top 10 Blues Rock Guitarists of the 1970s was compiled by a process of elimination that included dozens of guitar players. The criteria for choosing who makes the list was based on a number of factors, the first of which was that they had to be a blues rock guitarist at some point in their career. Second, they had to be performing and recording during the 1970s. Third, their impact or contribution to the genre of blues rock had to be substantial and have a lasting impact at least up to and including this time period. In some cases, there are great guitarists that could be included that would fit better in other decade lists, like Muddy Waters or Stevie Ray Vaughan. So it was with all this in mind that this list was compiled.

10. Steve Miller

By the age of six, Steve Miller as a guitar prodigy was a pupil of his godfather, guitarist Les Paul who was one of the creators of the first solid body electric guitar. His childhood was studded with interactions with a variety of musicians including T Bone Walker because his physician father was a serious amateur recording engineer. The turning point was when Miller arrived in San Francisco in 1966 and became part of the Haight Ashbury psychedelic scene. He formed the Steve Miller Blues Band and by the mid-1970s he was playing to stadiums with some of the most amazing clean blues rock guitar accompanying a series of chart topping blues based pop chart radio hits. He’s released 18 studio albums and another 15 live and compilation releases that have sold 24 million albums just in the US.

9. Bonnie Raitt

In a world dominated by men Bonnie Raitt became part of the emerging guitar driven blues music scene in 1971 when she released her eponymous debut album Bonnie Raitt. She began playing guitar at the age of eight when she received the instrument as a Christmas gift. Raitt grew up in an artistic home since her Father John Raitt was a successful actor and singer staring in Broadway productions of “Oklahoma” and “Carousel” and her mother “accomplished pianist/singer” Marge Goddard.  She’s on both Rolling Stone’s top 100 list of singers and guitar players, has won a total of ten Grammy Awards and was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as well as the Blues Hall of Fame.

8. Rory Gallagher

Rory Gallagher was born in 1948 in Ireland and began playing guitar at the age of nine. He was influenced by American and English artists like Leadbelly and Lonnie Donegan and earned his chops on the showband circuit where he played cover versions of popular radio hits. In 1966 he formed his own power trio called Taste and they opened for Cream’s farewell shows at the Royal Albert Hall. Gallagher quit the band in 1970  because he wanted to be in total control of his musical direction and he felt limited by Taste. While hanging out in Belfast he formed his new trio and by January 1971 they were in the studio recording. Gallagher was writing and producing his own music and he mixed it up with blues, folk and jazz as the trio toured Europe and America in support of his initial self titled solo release. Over the decades his guitar playing has influenced everyone from KISS and Judas Priest to Curt Cobain and Joe Bonamassa. He released over a dozen solo albums along with a half dozen with Taste as well as over a dozen compilation albums and boxed sets prior to and after his death in 1995. He is listed as #57 on Rolling Stones “Greatest Guitarists of All Time.”

7. Alvin Lee

The late Alvin Lee is another amazing blues rock guitarist that increased his popularity exponentially after his group Ten Years After appeared at Woodstock. He grew up in England and began playing guitar when he was 13 and put together an early version of Ten Years After when he was just 15 called the Jaybirds. By the early 1970s, Ten Years After released eight studio albums, and Lee began a solo career that produced a dozen studio albums. He was known as the fastest guitar player in the West with his “distinctive, soulful, rapid fire guitar playing.” The first album after Ten Years After was a collaboration with Mylon Lefevre a gospel music rock star called On the Road To Freedom and it included Mick Fleetwood, Ron Wood, Steve Winwood and George Harrison. Harrison was a frequent guest on Lee’s albums and was included on 1985’s Detroit Deisel and 1994 which was re-released as I Hear You Rocking. The latter album included “The Bluest Blues” which one reviewer called, “the most perfect blues song ever recorded.”

6. Robin Trower

Robin Trower was born in England in 1945 and began playing guitar as a teenager before he entered the London music scene in the early 1960s. After playing guitar for various groups including an R&B group called the Paramounts he joined Procol Harum in 1967. Trower was part of the band during its early years and left it after their fifth album Broken Barricades was released because he felt that he wasn’t able to fully express himself on guitar. After he left the group he formed a power trio and in 1973 he released his first solo album Twice Removed From Yesterday. In 1974, Trower released his landmark album Bridge of Sighs which peaked at number seven in the US Top 10. It drew attention to the fact that his guitar playing was “eerily similar” to the late Jimi Hendrix’s style of playing, yet it was uniquely his own. Over the next five decades he has released over 23 albums along with compilations and collaborations with Jack Bruce.

5. Mick Taylor

Mick Taylor was 8 years when he attended a Bill Hailey and the Comets’ show and began playing the guitar soon afterwards. He began forming music groups when he was ten years old and by the age of 14, he became interested in the blues. He was influenced by people like Buddy Guy, B.B. King and Freddie King and by the age of 16 he moved to London and began playing with bands. One night in 1965, Taylor was attending a John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers show. Guitarist Eric Clapton failed to show up for the gig and Taylor convinced Mayall to let him sit in. Nearly two years later when Peter Green left the group, Mayall hired Taylor to replace him. Over the next few years Taylor honed his blues skills and added a jazz aspect to the band. When Rolling Stone guitarist and founding member Brian Jones quit the group in 1969, Taylor replaced him just before his tragic death. After five years with the Stones he left the band in 1974 and recorded some albums with people like Jack Bruce, Ron Wood and Little Feat. In 1979 he released his first self titled solo album and over the next four decades he continued to perform as a solo artist as well as working with everyone from Bob Dylan to reuniting with the Rolling Stones. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with the Rolling Stones in 1989 and was ranked as #37 by Rolling Stone Magazine in its 2012 list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.

4. Carlos Santana

Carlos Santana grew up in Mexico where his father was a musician and Carlos began playing guitar at eight. He played in Tijuana bars as a teenager where he was exposed to the blues. After his family moved to San Francisco he formed the Santana Blues Band and they played Afro-Latin-blues-rock fusion at the Fillmore West. After playing a set at Woodstock Santana’s debut album Santana produced “Evil Ways” as the first Top 10 Hit and stayed on the charts for two years. He’s sold over 100 million albums, won ten Grammys, and has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He is #15 on Rolling Stones Greatest Guitarist List and has scored at least one Top 10 album for six consecutive decades since the 1960s.

3. Johnny Winter

Johnny Winter was born in 1944 in Beaumont, Texas and his brother Edgar was born two years later. They both became interested in music and Johnny took up guitar and Edgar keyboard and formed a music group together recording and releasing School Day Blues, a 45rpm record in 1959. Over the next seven years Johnny recorded a series of singles on a variety of record labels until 1966 when he ended up on Billboard’s Hot 100 with a cover of “Harlem Shuffle.” By 1968 he decided to concentrate on blues rock and formed a power trio with Tommy Shannon on bass and John “Red” Turner on drums. Soon after he was written up in Rolling Stone in 1968 as being the biggest music sensation from Texas since Janis Joplin. He signed what was then the largest advance to a solo recording artist with CBS Records. His first self-titled album for Columbia was released in April 1969 and secured his place at the Woodstock Festival in August. By 1971 after forming a new band and having a successful live record album he was at the peak of his success but took a nose dive due to heroin addiction and was out of commission until 1973 when he released his comeback album Still Alive and Well. During his career until he died in 2014 he released over two dozen albums and produced three Grammy Award winning albums by Muddy Waters.  He was the first non-African-American performer to be inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame and he posthumously won a Grammy in 2015 for Step Back as the best blues album.

2. Jeff Beck

Jeff Beck is an English guitar player that was born in 1944 and is #5 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Players. He was one of the three guitar players in the Yardbirds that included Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page. His influence on the group turned them on to psychedelic experimentation as he integrated electronic gadgets into transforming his guitar playing technique. The style that he played was called Raga Rock because it mimicked the sound of an Indian sitar. He mixed jazz aspects to his playing and helped develop what would eventually be called Heavy Metal. After leaving the Yardbirds he formed the Jeff Beck Group and released Truth. The band included Rod Stewart on vocals and future Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood playing bass guitar. Beck’s ability to effortlessly produce some of the most transcendent sounds imaginable with his axe has earned him seven Grammy Awards and two inductions into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame after six decades of performing and releasing over two dozen albums.

1. Jimmy Page

Jimmy Page was born in 1944 in England and began to play guitar by the time he was 13. After developing his skills on guitar he was able to work as a session musician in the early 1960s until he joined the Yardbirds in 1966. While in the Yardbirds he met Jeff Beck and the two collaborated and “Beck’s Bolero” was written by Page.  The song was Beck’s first recording after leaving the Yardbirds with Page putting together the backup band and playing on it. Page continued with the Yardbirds and when they disbanded he formed the New Yardbirds to fill the upcoming tour dates. The band was comprised of Robert Plant (vocals), John Paul Jones (bass and keyboards), John Bonham (drums) and Jimmy Page (guitar). When they released their first album they changed their name to Led Zeppelin. After releasing eight successful studio albums, at the pinnacle of their success, John Bonham died and the band disbanded. Page retired to his mansion that Satanist Aleister Crowley owned on the Loch Ness until 1982 when he began to play guitar again. He did collaborations with Robert Plant and formed the Firm with Paul Rodgers. Over the decades there were more collaborations along with Led Zeppelin reunions for special occasions using Jason Bonham on drums. Jimmy Page has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice and is one of the most important guitar players in blues rock history and is listed as #3 on Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Guitarists.

Also see: Top 10 Blues Rock Guitarists of the 1960s

Bob Gersztyn

As a teenager in Detroit, Michigan during the early 1960’s Bob Gersztyn saw many Motown and other R&B artists including Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder. After his discharge from the army in 1968 he attended school on the GI Bill and spent the next 3 years attending concerts and festivals weekly. It was the seminal period in Detroit rock & roll that Bob witnessed spawning the MC5 and Stooges along with shows featuring everyone from Jimi Hendrix and the “Doors” to B. B. King and John Lee Hooker. In 1971 He moved to Los Angeles, California to finish his schooling where he became an inner city pastor promoting and hosting gospel concerts. He moved to Oregon in 1982 and began photographing and reviewing concerts for music publications. Since that time he has published myriads of photographs, articles, interviews, and contributed to 2 encyclopedias and published 6 books on everything from music to the military. https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/Bob%20Gersztyn His rock & roll photo art is available for sale on Etsy @: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ConcertPhotoImages?ref=seller-platform-mcnav Bob may be contacted personally at bobgersztyn@gmail.com

80 thoughts on “Top 10 Blues Rock Guitarists of the 1970s

    • February 9, 2021 at 5:07 pm
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      Having been lucky enough to see every one of the guitarist listed here, most more than once, I agree with most, not all. As others have mentioned, omitting Peter Green is absolutely stunning. I was fully expecting him to be number #1 honestly.

      Steve Miller? Seriously?

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  • December 24, 2020 at 12:02 pm
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    You forgot Duane Allman—the only player on this list that could potentially go above him was Page. This is seriously a major omission

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  • December 24, 2020 at 12:38 pm
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    What about the master of the telecaster Roy Buchanan?

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    • December 24, 2020 at 7:31 pm
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      Sorry, no disrespect to Roy, but I thought Albert Collins held that title (Master of the Telecaster).

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  • December 24, 2020 at 12:38 pm
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    Jimmy Page as #1? You’ve gotta be kidding.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 12:56 pm
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    Agree with most. Good to see Alvin Lee getting some credit. Don’t know anyone who would rate Mick Taylor above Eric Clapton or Peter Green

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  • December 24, 2020 at 1:13 pm
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    The guy who doing this top maybe is born in the 90´s , where´s B B King, Albert King, Bo Diddley, Allman Brothers, Gary Moore, John Lee Hooker, John Mayall, Mike Bloomfield, Muddy Waters, Robert Cray ? etc etc

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  • December 24, 2020 at 1:50 pm
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    Falta Freddie King y Steve Ry Vaughan entre otros, sobran un montón:Bonnie Rait, Carlos Santana…

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  • December 24, 2020 at 1:57 pm
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    If you are going to mention blues artists then Mike Bloomfield should be among the best in the 1970s

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  • December 24, 2020 at 2:10 pm
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    What about Rory Gallagher or Lonnie Mack. We’re talking blues rock, not blues and not rock!

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  • December 24, 2020 at 2:13 pm
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    No Pat Travers? Hands down better than most this list

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  • December 24, 2020 at 2:17 pm
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    Its personnel choice before you get your nickers in a twist.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 2:25 pm
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    Brother Duane Allman. Nothing else need be said.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 2:49 pm
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    Remember we’re talking about players associated with the 70’s here. BB King and Muddy Waters don’t really come to mind when talking about the 70’s.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 2:49 pm
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    I think you have missed some big names, arguably close to the top of your list. Eric Clapton, Duane Allman are obvious ones. Personally I would also include Mark Knopfler and Albert Lee. I know Albert played country rock but his sheer virtuosity merits inclusion. There are probably quite a few more

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  • December 24, 2020 at 2:51 pm
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    Fernando Gomes, those players you mentioned are in the 40’s, 50’s, and 60’s, not the 70’s, which is what the article is about.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 2:52 pm
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    Clapton=60’s. Mark Knopfler=80’s.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 3:02 pm
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    Freddie King Earl King Otis Rush Johnny Guitar Watson BB King Buddy Guy Bo Didley Chuck Berry Scotty Moore
    Mike Bloomfield Roy Buchanan
    Duane Allman Peter Green Lonnie Mack Leslie West
    Kim Simonds Billy Gibbons Eric Clapton Gary Moore
    Keith Richards Rick Derringer
    Ritchie Blackmore
    John Fogerty Jorma,Garcia,and Bromberg comes to mind

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  • December 24, 2020 at 3:17 pm
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    Kim Simmonds, Peter Haycock

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  • December 24, 2020 at 3:18 pm
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    Yeah Buchanan and Eric Clapton hello

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  • December 24, 2020 at 4:10 pm
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    Missing: Kim Simmonds – Peter Green – Mike Bloomfield – Duane Allman – BB KIng – Freddie King – Albert King

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  • December 24, 2020 at 4:49 pm
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    Moi je rajoute celui que chacun oublie ds un groupe largement ignore en Europe et dont hendix disait qu il avait trouvé meilleur que lui … : Terry Kath du fabuleux groupe CHICAGO ( juste les 12 premiers albums magnifiques).
    OK avec tous les autres cités ici.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 5:16 pm
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    Leaving Hubert Sumlin and Buddy Guy off this list?

    You lost all credibility

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  • December 24, 2020 at 5:35 pm
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    Glad to see Rory get noticed! Alvin too. Bonnie is overlooked alot. I’m a big fan of The Iceman’, A. King, SRV, so NOT having the political correct pick of Hendrix makes me glad! J. Winter is the baddest bitch on the block!

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  • December 24, 2020 at 5:36 pm
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    Agree with all these guitarists being great but, Many omissions, mainly Duane Allman, Roy Buchanan and Johnny Guitar Watson.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 6:38 pm
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    When the question is the ten best guitarists, the losers who didn’t make the list could be great. Peter Green, Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Chuck Berry, Mike Bloomfield. Robert Johnson, Son House (who is credited by some as the person who taught Robert Johnson), Duane Allman and Muddy Waters to just name a few neglected geniuses.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 6:39 pm
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    Who wrote that list, an opera singer?

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  • December 24, 2020 at 6:54 pm
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    Have all of you lost your collective minds when you forgot Stevie Ray Vaughan? I want read a journalist who described SRVs Playing style as “attacking the guitar”, need we say more?

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  • December 24, 2020 at 7:35 pm
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    Although SRV would be very high on this list for all time blues guitarist he wasn’t in the 70’s.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 8:08 pm
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    Ritchie Blackmore was, still and will be the number one. But next to him Brian May, David Gilmour, Tonny Iommy, Andy Scott, Mick Box, Andrew Lattimer…..

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  • December 24, 2020 at 8:33 pm
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    Someone substituted the top ten blues guitarist from Europe, no where is Clapton.? wtf?

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  • December 24, 2020 at 8:34 pm
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    This list completely sucks. How about the three kings. Freddie,Albert, B.B. Maybe you’ve heard of them. Howabout Albert Collins or bernard allison. Johnny clyde Copeland. Sounds to me like you made up this list based on white privelage.All those guys are great guitarists,but they don’t know shit about playing the blues. You guys ought to be ashamed of yourselves.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 8:58 pm
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    Skydog …the best…in most hearts. RIP. You were the best at age 24. Unbelievable. Your brother Gregg is now with you. Hope I can hear you when I meet you again. Duane was the best with even more potential.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 9:04 pm
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    David Gilmour game over!

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  • December 24, 2020 at 9:55 pm
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    Duane Allman, Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton,Marc Knopfler, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Billy Gibbons, and Rod Price. To name a few. Don’t give me that crap about dates etc. These are all BluesRock hero’s from the considered dates. I’m sure I’m leaving a few out. Maybe it was an Opera singer.

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  • December 24, 2020 at 10:03 pm
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    Sorry, but Jimmy Page ?

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  • December 24, 2020 at 11:48 pm
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    All these guitarists are great. To each their own. Just like everyone’s religion. Merry Christmas. Oh, and, Dave fucking Meniketti! Listen to ‘On the Blue Side’. YnT forever!!!

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  • December 25, 2020 at 12:01 am
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    What about robert johnson

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  • December 25, 2020 at 1:53 am
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    I’m down with Meniketti but come on, Gary Moore is the Master bluesman. John Lee Hooker, hello! Many other lesser known, but still great should all be on this list!

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  • December 25, 2020 at 2:55 am
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    Hey settle down people! lists like this can be a waste of time as there so many good past and present guitarists. Its all about who rattles yer trousers the most!! Personally see Rory Gallagher up close a few times. For me one of the top boys has he had variety, check his live footage.
    Happy Rockin Christmas!

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  • December 25, 2020 at 3:39 am
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    Sure, it’s a subjective list, because music appreciation is subjective, but the following guys would be knocking on the door, and I’d let some of them in… Buddy Guy, Albert Collins, Gary Moore, Billy Gibbons, Peter Green, Duane Allman, David Gilmour, and the gone far too soon, Paul Kossoff of “Free” fame, because he was sick… There are others as well… And, I’m down with Jimmy Page getting some serious love – the man was a force of nature. But, c’mon, no Peter Green or Gary Moore?!?! What are we doing here?

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  • December 25, 2020 at 4:18 am
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    Some of these idiots can certainly talk through their anal orifice.

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  • December 25, 2020 at 6:24 am
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    Yo diria que escuches bastante mas y hagas nuevamente la lista…

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  • December 25, 2020 at 7:37 am
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    How can you put Carlos Santana before Mike Bloomfield who gave Santana lessons. Somehow folks forget how good Bloomfield was. Ask Dylan, or anyone who was around in the 70s and they will put Bloomfield at or near the top. Or, just listen to East West, Albert’s Shuffle, or Fine Jung Thing.

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  • December 25, 2020 at 8:25 am
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    Let us not forget John McGlaughlin. Rock, blues, jazz, carnation and fusion. From Mahavishnu Orchestra to Shakti, none approached his skill.

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  • December 25, 2020 at 8:25 am
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    Carnatic not carnation. Tsk tsk.

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  • December 25, 2020 at 9:27 am
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    Glad to see Rory Gallagher on the list but no mention of Tony TS Mcphee.

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  • December 25, 2020 at 10:41 am
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    I agree with most of these picks but are flabbergasted by others? Top 10 is the best of the best,afterall. Also some of the comments here didn’t read or understand the Top 10 category of Blues/Rock,not electric blues musicians! Holy crap of course John Lee Hooker, Albert king,hell Muddy Waters invented electricity! But,Jimmy Page? That fat Milwaukee ba$tard mimic Steve Miller? That makes me puke! Honorable mentions to the Late Leslie West and Frank Zappa. Roy Buchanan, period.

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  • December 25, 2020 at 10:45 am
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    Clapton and Allman should be both at no1

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  • December 25, 2020 at 1:13 pm
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    Billy Gibbons must surely be in there. Carlos Santana was a great guitarist, but not really blues.

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  • December 25, 2020 at 1:57 pm
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    Clapton and Gary Moore are high on my list

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  • December 25, 2020 at 3:03 pm
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    What about eddie van halen, gary moore, leslie west, richie blackmore? Bonnie? Wow

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  • December 25, 2020 at 4:06 pm
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    Buzz feiten Jeremy Spencer dannykirwan Amos Garret Larry Carlton robbenford dickey Betts Shannon kurfman

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  • December 25, 2020 at 4:17 pm
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    Crap list, no Kossoff, Green or Allan.

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    • December 26, 2020 at 6:48 am
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      Yeah, where is Kossoff?

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  • December 25, 2020 at 4:18 pm
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    Allman, bloody auto correct

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  • December 25, 2020 at 6:53 pm
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    Clapton, hands down. Sure he started in the ’60s but really peaked in the ’70s.

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  • December 25, 2020 at 10:47 pm
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    The reverend Billy G. Is a great one.

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  • December 25, 2020 at 11:22 pm
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    Not sure where you found this list but if you don’t have the three Kings, Buddy Guy on this its not a list blue men. I’d like to hear what Santana would says about your list. Next time create one of the great Country guitarist of the the 70s and stick Page on top.

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  • December 26, 2020 at 12:01 am
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    Duane Allman. Period. Died at 24 and played circles around everyone except perhaps mick Taylor and Freddie king.

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  • December 26, 2020 at 12:58 am
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    So many guitar players so little time. The blues of the 70s. Pete Townshend played the blues. Frank Zappa Ry Cooder Danny Gatton Roy Buchanan Jerry Garcia. Chuck Berry Albert King Albert Collins Robbie Robertson. So many screaming guitar players. I don’t know why or how anybody would want to make a list of 10 through 1. Lots of homage to the Blues greats that it came from. Robert Johnson Ledbetter all of the folks that made it up to Chicago and Detroit and electrified it. Willie Dixon for writing so many great songs.

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  • December 26, 2020 at 3:07 am
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    Did you have an intern do this piece? Some of the players you have chosen are not Even blues players.

    Here is a couple of blues players:

    Peter Green
    Eric clapton
    BB King
    Albert King
    Freddie King
    Albert Collins
    Roy Buchannon
    Duane Allmann

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  • December 26, 2020 at 6:47 am
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    Jimmy Page number 1!

    Yes again, he’s one of the overrated guitarist ever.

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  • December 26, 2020 at 7:31 am
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    A nice list of guitarists, it’s just that I think some of them don’t particularly belong on a ‘blues-rock’ list.

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  • December 26, 2020 at 11:18 am
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    Just throw in a couple of people without regard to quality. Page is good no doubt. What about:
    All the blues artists?
    Muddy Waters
    Gate mouth
    John Lee Hooker
    Buddy guy
    Hendrixs died in 1970 he count
    Others:
    Angus Young?
    Your list seems a bit fragile. Let’s try again with a little feeling.

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  • December 29, 2020 at 10:30 am
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    Excellent selection although I would have squeezed in Paul Kossoff from Free. Rory Gallagher also would be a worthy contender.

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  • January 1, 2021 at 1:18 pm
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    What about Woody from the Bay City Rollers, absolute genius.

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  • January 2, 2021 at 4:13 am
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    Interesting reading most of these comments. Obviously most haven’t seen the ‘Top 10 Guitarists of the 60’s’? Everyone has their opinion, it’s an individual opinion, it’s not some sort of ‘definitive top 10’. Get a grip. You don’t agree, fine, no one’s forcing you to. But, one things for certain, you can’t have 50+ top 10 guitarists. I have my own opinion, but it’s not that important.

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  • January 5, 2021 at 5:49 pm
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    Funny/sad no mention of the greats from Chicago, and the deep South.

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  • January 6, 2021 at 11:47 am
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    Good to see Rory Gallagher. . .but not that far down the list. Blues Rock? Delete Miller, Santana, and Beck(!). While talented, their sounds are all their own. Replace them with Paul Kossoff, Peter Green and Kim Simmonds. That’ some long-surviving Blues Rock.

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  • January 9, 2021 at 12:37 am
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    No Rory Gallagher means your idiots next to SRV He owned this scene. Roy Buchanan and Thrower.

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  • March 31, 2021 at 8:42 am
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    I like steve miller and so amazing article !
    thank you

    Reply

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