Top 10 Gary Moore Songs

There are very few guitarists who are able to convey their feelings through their guitar playing as well as Gary Moore. One of the most iconic and highly revered six-stringers in history, countless musicians have acknowledged Moore’s influence and moving tone on their playing. Legendary bluesman Albert King reputedly said of the late, great Irish Bluesman: “Gary plays like his fingers are on fire. He plays rock and blues and I call his style a kind of rock blues thing.”

Over the course of his career, he was a member of both Skid Row and Thin Lizzy before going on to find fame as a solo artist. Moore tragically died on February 6, 2011 while on holiday in Spain from a heart attack but left behind an outstanding legacy of work with styles ranging from rock to jazz and even electronica. However, ultimately it is his command of the blues and artistry in this genre that remains his most acclaimed.

Here are Blues Rock Review’s top 10 Gary Moore songs.

10. “Lost In Your Love”

Moore decided to experiment with contemporary dance beats by playing over drum loops and programmed rhythms on his 1995 release A Different Beat. The album may have been a dagger to the heart of Moore fans firmly engrained in his traditional blues roots, but “Lost In Your Love” with its buoyant techno tempo is well worth the build-up for the exquisite guitar solo alone.

(Buy on Amazon)

9. “Story Of The Blues”

Another worthy candidate for the greatest Gary Moore solo comes in this serene, mournful tale which concludes with Moore ripping through two minutes of intense, slow-burning fretwork. “Story Of The Blues” is a supremely executed narrative in how to make few notes say so much.

(Buy on Amazon)

8. “Ball and Chain”

After over a decade of roiling the electrical blues scene (save for a couple of experimental albums), Moore produced his heaviest material to date with the release of the power-trio album Scars in 2002.

The epic “Ball and Chain” crashes in at just under 13 minutes and recalls the hard-hitting Muddy Waters sound of the Chicago blues era. Moore effortlessly flicks from onerous riffing and blistering fast leads to raw and earthy slow playing, keeping the listener on edge through his masterful dynamic control.

(Buy on Amazon)

7. “Midnight Blues”

A firm favorite with his fanbase, “Midnight Blues” sees Moore wander into deep reflective territory at the witching hour with a sullen, bluesy riff, dark lyrics, and driving bass and string arrangement. The heart-rending guitar wails over the melancholic theme of this atmospheric track which was notably covered by Joe Bonamassa in 2012.

(Buy on Amazon)

6. “Cold Day In Hell”

The Irishman’s After Hours album is often overlooked due to it being the predecessor to his classic Still Got The Blues LP, but “Cold Day In Hell” is a no-prisoners approach throwback to his hard rock days. Full of attacking thunder, Moore soars above the horn-blasting romp, powerful keys and some fine backing vocals with typical fluidity and that trademark killer tone.

(Buy on Amazon)

5. “Empty Rooms”

Featuring arguably Moore’s most emotionally charged solo, this sobering, powerhouse ballad bubbles slowly and methodically for the song’s blockbuster crescendo. For anyone who has suffered from the devastation of broken romance, this is how a guitar sounds when it is weeping.

Check out the Live In Stockholm 1987 version of this song – strongly considered one of his most spine-chilling performances.

(Buy on Amazon)

4. “Blues For Narada”

Total mastery par excellence. This instrumental opus encapsulates the sublimity and emotional connection that Moore was able to coax from his Les Paul. Backed by a beautiful string section, this is a flawless statement in measured and soulful blues playing as Moore hangs on to every note with perfect poise.

(Buy on Amazon)

3. “Oh Pretty Woman (Feat Albert King)”

This swinging number from Moore’s breakthrough album Still Got The Blues sees the Irishman come flying out the traps with a rip-roaring introduction before settling into the funk-infused groove which swarms with inspired interplay alongside the tenor sax and horns. The searing lead tone (in particular on the scorching guitar solo) throughout this collaboration with King remains one of his most emulated.

(Buy on Amazon)

2. “Parisienne Walkways”

Featuring the tender vocals of Phil Lynott lamenting the father he never had, this alluring slow gem has become the Belfast-born guitarist’s signature anthem. As the lyrical elegance and romanticism camouflage the composition’s indignant nostalgia, it is Moore who seduces and enthralls with his virtuoso guitar work.

Reaching number eight in the UK Singles Chart in May 1979, “Parisienne Walkways” is also notable for the interminable sustained note in the middle of the song which became a staple of Moore’s live performances.

(Buy on Amazon)

1. “Still Got The Blues”

The title track of Moore’s career-revitalizing Still Got The Blues record is a modern blues masterpiece that embodies the passionate, majestic and beautiful lead playing that we associate with the renowned Gibson Les Paul musician.

Remarkably recorded in one take, Moore pours every last drop of his soul into the vocals and pulls on the strings of his guitar as if his life is dependent on it. Packed full of sorrowful sentiment, the squealing bends and poignant tone perfectly showcase his ability to transcend his feelings to the listener through his fingers.

(Buy on Amazon)

Mascot/Provogue will be releasing a new album, How Blue Can You Get on April 30 which features previously unreleased material from the blues-rock master.

20 thoughts on “Top 10 Gary Moore Songs

  • April 1, 2021 at 1:25 pm
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    “Trouble At Home”.

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  • April 1, 2021 at 7:41 pm
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    If anyone is paying this person, please stop. Send them to review something else that they might have inkling of knowledge about.

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    • April 4, 2021 at 9:14 am
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      Who’s to say that your choices would be correct? It’s a matter of opinion so why don’t you get off your high horse with your unwanted negativity on a great article.

      Reply
  • April 1, 2021 at 10:42 pm
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    Are you kidding? “I’ll Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know” was the greatest performance that Gary Moore or any blues guitarist ever recorded and it doesn’t appear on your top 10. You’re a frickin moron.

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    • April 4, 2021 at 9:16 am
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      The only ‘frickin moron’ around here is you. Why do you think your choices are correct? It’s a matter of opinion which you’re welcome to have but it doesn’t mean you’re correct.

      Reply
  • April 2, 2021 at 7:38 am
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    Kalle. Picking the top 10 Gary Moore songs is like being asked to pick your top 10 Messi goals…virtually impossible. What ‘obvious’ ones have I missed?

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  • April 2, 2021 at 10:09 am
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    You missed “once in a blue mood” Gary’s best.

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  • April 2, 2021 at 12:33 pm
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    How could you leave the loner out of this list

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  • April 2, 2021 at 12:37 pm
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    Great job, Breton! Still Got The Blues is such a timeless classic and an excellent choice for the number 1. spot. My personal favorites also include “Preacher Man’s Blues”, “Rectify”, “You Know My Love”, “Blood of Emeralds” and the hidden gem “Boogie My Way Back Home”. Anyway, your picks were also superb. Thanks!

    Reply
  • April 2, 2021 at 2:20 pm
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    Wozu darüber streiten. Gary war und ist einzigartig. Viele seiner Stücke müssten auf diese Liste. Jeder hat seine Lieblingssongs. Vielleicht erstellt ja Mal jemand eine ” top 100″. Dann kommen noch mehr Fans auf ihre Kosten.

    Reply
  • April 3, 2021 at 12:52 am
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    Sorry, have you ever listened to Gary Moore or did your editor assign this to you, you read wikapidia and some other Gary Moore articles? No End of the World? No Out in the Fields? The last being not only a incredible Gary Moore song but also, the last ever recording by Phil Lynott with whom, Moore is collaborating on the track with, is such an integral aspect to the Gary Moore saga! Your list is not only weak but sad too!

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    • April 4, 2021 at 4:19 am
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      End of the World and Out in the Fields are not blues songs.

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    • April 4, 2021 at 6:43 pm
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      You are actually pathetic taking the time to write such a comment thinking you are gods gift and know it all. You are weak and sad!

      Reply
  • April 3, 2021 at 4:53 am
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    Hi Breton,

    Your article popped up in my feed and I was immediately struck by the familiarity of your name.
    I went to music college in Lincoln with Clinton and remember him fondly. I attended the celebration of his life in Horncastle where a few locals bands play and I believe you were there with your family then too.
    It’s great to see you have a passion for music too and I am certain that Clinton would have been very proud.
    I still remember him talking to me about which mode he was using in a solo and baffling me with his knowledge down in the rehearsal rooms at college.

    Take care,

    Chris

    Reply
  • April 4, 2021 at 1:53 am
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    Mr. Towler,
    Thanks for putting together such a good stand-alone list, which also prompted a few extra suggestions from readers. I believe these will prompt me into purchasing even more of the Gary Moore catalogue than I already own.
    ###
    It was interesting to recently discover the fact that George Harrison lived near Gary Moore, and that he invited him to play “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” during a live show at the Royal Albert Hall, which I believe was Harrison’s final public performance. Harrison was obviously a good friend and a big fan of Moore, and just like Harrison himself found what I feel was his true North Star in the gentle perfection of his slide guitar work, it’s usually not the “flying fretwork” that best defines a guitarist, but rather, it’s the slower tunes that showcase an artist’s ability to become one with the instrument in order to convey a particular mood.
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    Gary Moore was an unquestioned genius in the minds of many, and his work will live on…

    Reply
    • April 4, 2021 at 4:22 am
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      Gary recorded one of his songs That Kind of Woman, and Harrison played on it too.

      Reply
  • April 5, 2021 at 6:58 am
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    Everyone’s choice of Gary Moore tracks will vary. No one is right or wrong in their choice. So many negative comments… Freedom of choice is eroded away when you tell someone they are wrong because their choice is different to yours…

    BTW, Back On The Streets is one of my favourites.

    Reply
  • April 6, 2021 at 4:17 am
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    Gary Moore was one of the most gifted guitarists to ever live. It doesnt matter what song he played. He played it with passion and fire and we all were so blessed knowing him and hid music. Gary youre the best. Rest in Peace my brother. There’ll never be another Gary Moore

    Reply

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